Wearable technology integration to grow, report says

In-vehicle wearable integration is the latest trend in automotive with announcements following each other in quick succession: Harman’s ADAS Google Glass integration, Hyundai’s Blue Link Glassware application, Mercedes’ Pebble smart watch Digital DriveStyle application, BMW’s i3 EV Samsung Galaxy Gear smart watch integration, Nissan’s Nismo concept smart watch displaying biometric and vehicle diagnostics and performance data, and INRIX’s real-time traffic Google Glass demo app.

Following this wake of in-vehicle smartphone integration, wearable form-factors will interface – directly or via phones – with more than 90 per cent of vehicles shipping globally in 2019, according to new findings from ABI Research.

“With in-car infotainment becoming a key customer proposition, the automotive industry is designing user interfaces both offering a rich and convenient experience and guaranteeing safety by preventing driver distraction. While head unit proximity touch screens, heads up displays and speech recognition are now well established, the quest for next-generation automotive HMI is still on with gesture recognition, eye control and augmented reality edging closer to implementation. At the same time, wearable form-factors are being explored bearing testimony to the automotive industry’s objective to keep up with consumer electronics innovation. But they also contribute to creating a seamless digital user experience inside and outside the vehicle,” said Dominique Bonte, VP and practice director at ABI.

However, the use of wearables in cars is controversial with many governments dismissing them for safety reasons. Legislation banning eyewear is already prepared in several U.S. states and in the UK. But jurisdiction seems to be lacking as illustrated by cases dismissed on grounds it could not be proven the device was either switched on or a distracting application used. Clearly, it is not the form-factor which should be banned but certain use cases such as watching videos. Eyewear functioning as dash cams or for displaying blind spot or collision safety alerts will contribute to safer driving, not deter it. At the same time wearables will kick start a thriving after-market connected car application ecosystem.

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Jim Love, Chief Content Officer, IT World Canada

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