BlackBerry debuts 5” Z30 smartphone

Android device makers have been heating-up the 5” smartphone market with models from Samsung, Sony, and HTC to name but a few. And now BlackBerry is getting into the larger screen market with a device of its own: the BlackBerry Z30.

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Coming to Canada soon

The Blackberry Z30 will be available in Canada in the coming weeks with Bell, Telus, MTS and SaskTel. It will run the BlackBerry 10.2 OS, which includes BlackBerry Priority Hub and BBM in Any App. The device itself features a 5” super AMOLED display and is powered by a 1.7 GHz processor with quad core graphics.

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Rounding-out the BlackBerry 10 portfolio

“The new BlackBerry Z30 smartphone builds on the solid foundation and engaging user experience of the BlackBerry 10 platform with features like the powerful BlackBerry Hub, its exceptional touchscreen keyboard and industry leading browser,” said Carlo Chiarello, executive vice-president for products at BlackBerry. “The smartphone rounds out the BlackBerry 10 portfolio and is designed for people looking for a smartphone that excels at communications, messaging and productivity.”

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Now with stereo speakers

BlackBerry is also touting the Z30’s stereo speakers, as well as BlackBerry Natural Sound, a new technology exclusive to BlackBerry OS 10.2 that promises to make BBM Voice and BBM Video chats sound more natural and realistic.

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And a better antenna

The BlackBerry Z30 has new antenna technology that tunes reception for better connectivity in low reception areas, as well as faster data transfers and few dropped calls. It also includes a 2880 mAh battery, the largest ever for a BlackBerry, promising up to 25 hours of mixed use.

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A veteran technology and business journalist, Jeff Jedras began his career in technology journalism in the late 1990s, covering the booming (and later busting) Ottawa technology sector for Silicon Valley North and the Ottawa Business Journal, as well as everything from municipal politics to real estate. He later covered the technology scene in Vancouver before joining IT World Canada in Toronto in 2005, covering enterprise IT for ComputerWorld Canada. He would go on to cover the channel as an assistant editor with CDN. His writing has appeared in the Vancouver Sun, the Ottawa Citizen and a wide range of industry trade publications.